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American, European Forces Join Hands To Help Ukrainian Forces Fight

DailyMail.com has learned that ‘hundreds’ of Western volunteers who fought the Islamic State in Syria are now fighting on the Ukrainian Frontlines. Americans, Brits, and Canadians are among a slew of fighters who have once again decided to put their lives on the line for a group of strangers on the front lines of a horrific conflict. Many say they felt driven to help in the face of what they allege was Western inactivity. Some have joined the Ukrainian military, while others are volunteer battlefield medics.

A British and an American physician revealed in exclusive interviews that they have formed a new ‘Nightingale Squadron,’ which will deploy medical supplies and train frontline first responders on how to utilize them. Macer Gifford, a 35-year-old British former banker, volunteered in Syria from 2014 alongside the Kurdish militia or YPG, subsequently known as the Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF). He said he established up a unit there that ferried 700 wounded to hospitals, including those injured in the fierce combat surrounding ISIS’s last stronghold in Raqqa, and trained 600 individuals in battlefield assistance.

The freedom fighting volunteers stocked their armored Land Rover with 170 first aid kits

Now he’s on his way to Ukraine’s frontlines, driving an armoured Land Rover loaded with 170 first-aid kits and ‘tens of thousands of dollars’ in donated equipment. ‘People believed that internationalism had died. ‘I feel it has returned now,’ he remarked. ‘The folks who have gone to Syria have absolutely amazed me. And it comes as no surprise to me that almost 70% of those who travelled to Syria have since ended up in Ukraine. ‘ Hundreds of people who were in Syria and Iraq could now be in Ukraine. ‘I personally know at least 20 of them,’ he claimed. ‘It’s an honor to be a part of it,’ she says.

‘I was moved by the immediacy with which the Ukrainian people demanded assistance.’ And the same feeling I had before I went to Syria is the same feeling I have today.’ Aiden Aslin, a former SDF colleague and fellow Brit, was seized by Russian forces during a 45-day siege in Mariupol, Ukraine’s southeast Donbass region. ‘The last we heard from Aiden, he was surrounded, out of ammunition, and out of food,’ Gifford claimed, adding that he and his Ukrainian marine battalion were forced to surrender.

‘Mariupol resembles Raqqa and Mosul in that it is a fierce street-to-street battle. Snipers were hidden in plain sight. IDs for explosives might be found everywhere. Tanks were fighting in the streets, and people were dying and falling where they fell,’ he claimed. Days after his battalion surrendered, Aslin, 28, was marched out on Kremlin state television with a large red mark on his forehead and a swollen eye.

American Brennan Philips, who previously volunteered in Syria, is seen delivering a rousing speech to Ukrainian soldiers

Now he’s on his way to Ukrainian frontlines, driving an armoured Land Rover loaded with 170 first-aid kits and ‘tens of thousands of dollars’ in donated equipment. ‘People believed that internationalism had died. ‘I feel it has returned now,’ he remarked. ‘The folks who have gone to Syria have absolutely amazed me. And it comes as no surprise to me that almost 70% of those who travelled to Syria have since ended up in Ukraine.

‘Hundreds of people who were in Syria and Iraq could now be in Ukraine.’ ‘I personally know at least 20 of them,’ he claimed. ‘It’s an honour to be a part of it,’ she says. I was moved by the immediacy with which the Ukrainian people demanded assistance. And the same feeling I had before I went to Syria is the same feeling I have today.’ Aiden Aslin, a former SDF colleague and fellow Brit, was seized by Russian forces during a 45-day siege in Mariupol, Ukraine’s southeast Donbass region.

‘The last we heard from Aiden, he was surrounded, out of ammunition, and out of food,’ Gifford claimed, adding that he and his Ukrainian marine battalion were forced to surrender. ‘Mariupol resembles Raqqa and Mosul in that it is a fierce street-to-street battle. Snipers were hidden in plain sight. IDs for explosives might be found everywhere. Tanks were fighting in the streets, and people were dying and falling where they fell,’ he claimed. Days after his battalion surrendered, Aslin, 28, was marched out on Kremlin state television with a large red mark on his forehead and a swollen eye.