Marvel

Lady Thor: How Jane Foster May Potentially Become An Actual God

How will Jane become Lady Thor and an actual God? Thor: Love & Thunder could shape Jane Foster into the real Goddess of Thunder, with Thor Odinson becoming the God of Gods. Thor: Ragnarok director Taika Waititi has returned to the MCU for the unavoidable sequel. This time around, Waititi promises to be more faithful to the comics, particularly Jason Aaron’s iconic run that transformed Jane Foster into Thor.

Jane Foster, played by Natalie Portman, is being transformed into Lady Thor by Mjolnir, which is making a triumphant return. Even though Steve Rogers, in Avengers: Endgame, was the first to prove his worthiness to hold the hammer of Mjolnir, she is the first human to be transformed into the hammer when she does so. While Captain America gained all of Thor’s powers, Jane is getting a completely new look as Lady Thor. Thor Odinson’s true identity may be revealed in the course of the film, or he may not know it until they meet. In the comics, Jane wore a helmet to hide her face, and Odinson only learned the truth after a few months.

In the comics, Jane Foster was deserving to become Lady Thor because she was dying of cancer. It was a price she was willing to pay for the sake of heroism, even though her heroics were putting her life at risk, but she firmly believed that there must always be a Thor and that the sacrifice was worth it. Thor: Love & Thunder’s cancer plot has been confirmed, and Jane Foster may have the opportunity to become the literal Goddess of Thunder as a result.

How Does a Human Become a God?

It is common in the comics for anyone who is capable to wield Mjolnir to gain the power of Thor, and they typically (though not always) transform into Thor as a result. For the most part, this is only a short-term change, and they return to normal when they lose physical contact with Mjolnir for a predetermined amount of time. Comics have been incongruent in their treatment of these changed beings, sometimes suggesting that they not only have the power of Thor but that they are gods in their own right, too. In the case of Jane Foster, she was not only referred to as “the Mighty Thor,” but also “the Goddess of Thunder”.

However, there have been instances in comic books where a human being has become a divine being, such as the case of Alexander Aaron, a teenager. Ares and an unknown human woman had a son named Alex, who inherited his father’s godlike abilities. As a member of Nick Fury’s Secret Warriors, he was given the codename Phobos for his ability to instil fear in the minds of those around him. The God of War was proud of his son’s achievements, and he took him to Olympus to meet the other demigods one day. As a result of Phobos’ recognition by the gods of Olympios, Ares told his son that there was one more thing he needed to do before becoming a god.

“You were born a mortal boy, son of a mortal woman, and while you are not a demigod you will not achieve your full godhood until one final thing happens.”

He took a breath, which compelled Alex to enquire further.

“You must die, son, so that you may one day be reborn,” Ares explained. It seems that, in the Marvel Universe, death is the final stage to becoming a god.”

Jane Foster’s cancer story could end in death

In Jason Aaron’s iconic run as the Mighty Thor, Jane Foster is being adapted into Thor: Love & Thunder. In Thor #705, Jane Foster died after deciding to take on the identity of Thor for one final time. A final transformation would be enough to kill Jane in the story, as she had become so weak from transforming into Thor.

Although they had previously refused to accept her, she chose to stand up for the Realm Eternal when Asgard was threatened by a creature called the Mangog. Mangog could only be defeated by attaching an unbreakable chain to the monster and attaching it to Mjolnir, then throwing Mjolnir directly into the sun. As a result of this, Mjolnir’s magic was rendered ineffective, and Jane was reduced to the status of a normal human being… before dying.

Jason Aaron’s handling of the death of the Mighty Thor was clever from a thematic standpoint. According to Christian belief, God made a supreme sacrifice in order to save humanity, and both the films and comics featuring the (Lady) Thor have emphasized this idea of self-sacrifice as a fundamental element in being worthy.

In the case of Jane Foster, however, destiny flipped this on its head because she was a human choosing to die for the gods. The Mangog may not be in Thor: Love & Thunder, but Gorr the God-Butcher, the film’s main antagonist, is on a similar quest to slay all gods. As a result, it would be entirely appropriate if the story came to a similar conclusion. In the comics, death is a revolving door; Odin resurrected Jane from the dead. Alternatively, Jane’s death could serve as the final step in her ascension to godhood within the MCU. She has the potential to be a new, more powerful Thor.

Ascending to the rank of god

Thor Odinson is already a god, but in reality, he is no longer fulfilling his duties as a protector of the universe. In the Marvel Cinematic Universe, Thor’s storyline has been erratic, but the central theme is that of a god in search of his or her own identity. Odin banished Thor to Earth, enchanting Mjolnir with the worthiness enchantment, and thus began Thor’s journey to discover what kind of god he should be. When he encounters a new Goddess of Thunder in Thor: Love & Thunder’s trailer, this is only going to get worse.

A new identity may be revealed for Thor Odinson if Thor: Love & Thunder is based on comic books. Finally, Gorr the God-Butcher created a weapon that would destroy every god in existence, the God-Bomb. In the face of this fearsome adversary, the gods put their trust in Thor. Through this faith, Odinson was given power, unlike anything he had ever seen before and was briefly known as the “God of Gods.” When Thor Odinson ascends to become the permanent ruler of all the gods in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, Jane Foster takes his place among the Norse Pantheon. Thor: Love & Thunder would have a strong focus on identity and transformation if that were the case.